What percentage of employees at your company is younger than 35 years old?

May 21, 2008
THE TALK...



The Talk, Page 2...

Survey Results for 05/21/2008:

What percentage of employees at your company is younger than 35 years old?

Between 50 and 75 percent

  

 

54%

 

Less than 25 percent

  

 

24%

 

More than 75 percent (and you'd better email Christina if you pick this!)

  

 

22%

 

Christina Lewellen,
senior editor
of Window & Door

I got some very encouraging emails this week after wondering aloud whether our window and door industry professionals make for an aging population. The poll results indicate we might be in better shape than I would have guessed.

Some companies are younger than others. WTS Paradigm, for example, figures at least 75 percent of its employee roster is younger than 35 years old. It makes sense, given the technological aspect of software development, but HR specialist Amber Mau says the company’s culture helps attract younger folks to the fold. “One reason we’re able to
be so competitive with hiring the best employees has to do with our culture, benefits and technology. We are a laid back, results-focused company that gives much autonomy to our employees to work on new projects and ideas to help WTS Paradigm grow.”

I heard from a handful of young professionals who have every intention of making a life-long career in the window and door business:

My jobs have allowed me to travel throughout the U.S.—training, attending meetings, etc.,” says one 37-year-old testing and certification coordinator who joined the industry as a college production worker at a window manufacturing facility. “It’s now my comfort zone, and I will most likely stay within that zone. I’ve met some really great people during these 19 years and I owe a great deal of gratitude to those that have taken the time to teach me along the way.

Another windows and glass shop retailer took the time to write to me about a 31-year-old vice president at his company: “He is very capably running our $8-10 million a year business. He is very intelligent and very involved. He is a true up-and-comer in our business. He is capable of making the right decisions, while wearing multiple hats. He has truly learned a lot in his six years in the business.

Very, very encouraging. If you are part of the up-and-coming generation serving our industry, send me an email and share your tale. Why are you in this industry, and will you be a lifer too?


E-mail Christina at clewellen@glass.org.