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  • In 1990, Penn State University joined the Big Ten, giving the conference 11 members. Why didn’t the conference change its name? Besides the fact that “Big Eleven” doesn’t exactly roll off the tongue, the Big Ten is one of the strongest brands in all of sports. To change it would have meant throwing away tremendous brand equity built over many generations of sports fans.... more »
  • Numerous exhibitors at the AMD show were buzzing about Fortune Brands’ decision to pull its companies—including Therma-Tru Doors—out of the 2008 International Builders’ Show. I heard unconfirmed rumors that other companies—including a big window manufacturer—had dropped out or were considering dropping out too. News like that reinforces what most of us know... more »
  • If you hire an advertising agency or marketing consultant, you are likely paying them good money to help you build your brand. When they come to you with recommendations or ideas, you should trust them like you would a lawyer or an accountant. They are experts, after all. However, don’t trust them blindly. If something doesn’t seem right, trust your instincts and voice your concerns... more »
  • This year's study examines what’s being sold along with windows and doors in the new construction market
    Today’s builders buy windows and doors from a variety of sources. They often buy those windows and doors together with other products and services. With our 2007 Supply Chain Study, Window & Door set out to get a better handle on what builders want and expect today—and how various channels within the industry are looking to cater to their needs. The following report presents... more »
  • 2007 Supply Chain Study examines what’s being sold along with windows and doors in the new construction market
    Today’s builders buy windows and doors from a variety of sources. They often buy those windows and doors together with other products and services. With our 2007 Supply Chain Study, Window & Door set out to get a better handle on what builders want and expect today—and how various channels within the industry are looking to cater to their needs. The following report presents... more »
  • If you’re married, you know one of the worst things you can do is forget your anniversary. The same goes for your business, because anniversaries are tremendous opportunities to get noticed. If your company is approaching a milestone anniversary (5, 25, 75 and any multiples of 10), use that as an opportunity to create some excitement. Submit a story to your local newspaper, have a special... more »
  • This week, I want you to go out of order. Before I taint you with the following information, take the poll to the left, then come back and read the rest. Ok—you voted, right? A news story (see The Outside View...) announcing some continuing good news for tintable glass developer Sage Electrochromics explains how the emerging supplier has set up shop in Faribault, Minn. Sage’s CEO,... more »
  • One of the best ways to build awareness and build your brand is publicity. Having a story about you in your local paper gets your name out to more potential customers. But don’t stop there. Merchandise the publicity to your customers. Tell your salespeople to mention it to their customers. Hand out reprints at your showroom. Put a story about it in your newsletter. Link to the story on... more »
  • What will homes look like in the future, and what kind of products will they demand from our industry? Last week, the mall in Washington, D.C., offered a preview, with teams from 20 universities worldwide building solar-powered homes for the Solar Decathlon, sponsored by the Department of Energy. Lorin Hancock, with our sister publication Glass Magazine, reported on the event in their electronic... more »
  • When creating your messaging for your ads, Web site or other materials, you will be tempted to use the following phrases: “Low prices,” “High quality,” and “Great service.” Don’t. These phrases are overused to the point of being meaningless. Too many businesses use these taglines, and they are not memorable. Instead, find something truly unusual about... more »