Latest Articles in Opening Remarks

  • The lazy, crazy, hazy days of summer are still with us, but in this issue, Window & Door looks ahead to the fall and GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window & Door Expo, September 10-12 in Atlanta. It's the first of several fall events where window and door industry executives will gather and get down to business, either finalizing plans for 2014 or preparing for what's next. For... more »
  • In this issue, we focus on entry doors, and I urge everyone to read our main feature article, "Entry Doors See Sales Resurgence," on page XX.  It offers a number of good insights into the door market, of course, but what I like about it is the enthusiasm manufacturers express across the board.  Door manufacturers are reporting double-digit growth, thanks in no small part to... more »
  • New housing starts are expected to be up nearly 20 percent in 2013, and it's anticipated remodeling and replacement will see double-digit growth rates in the first and second quarter. Ten years ago, that would have made window and door executives giddy about the year ahead. I’m not looking for giddy now. The past six years have been rough on most of our businesses. Dysfunction in Washington... more »
  • Technology in the window and door industry generally advances in baby steps. Change—as we see in electronics or communications—generally isn’t radical. There’s not constant shifting we see in fashion or even food. I know the pace of change in our industry is sometimes frustrating to developers of new technologies who don’t understand why companies may be slow to... more »
  • Most economists–and many industry executives–see new construction increasing, with additional growth expected next year. Remodeling and replacement activity is also on the upswing, with even bigger gains expected for 2013. I've been on the cautious side regarding our current recovery, but I am becoming increasingly confident that things are really getting better for the window and... more »
  • New demands and new materials mean constant change in the way windows and doors are made. The way we install our products has also changed in recent years. But the most rapid change we are seeing in the industry these days is probably coming in how we sell windows and doors. The internet has changed all our lives and today, it’s rapidly changing how we interact with customers and potential... more »
  • At times during this long, slow economic recovery, I’ve felt like someone hit the “pause” button for the window and door industry. We’re gearing up and moving forward for a little while, and then things seem to stop. On page XX of this issue, we highlight the results of the annual market study prepared by Ducker Research for the American Architectural Manufacturers... more »
  • Most window and door manufacturers and dealers talk very cautiously about the future. The downturn in the economy, coupled with some false starts on the road to recovery, has produced a significant change in attitude to our industry. In the ’80 and ’90s, there was always an underlying optimism—even when economic forecasts were less than rosy. That optimism grew and grew as we... more »
  • The International Builders’ Show held in February was different this year in a number of ways. Perhaps the most obvious difference was its smaller size, with a number of big, traditional exhibitors—including window and door manufacturers—opting out for the year. Attendance seemed to be up, however, as the aisles seemed busier than previous years. What was also noteworthy was the... more »
  • Last year was tough for the industry. But as 2011 winded down, there were new signs of hope. Single-family home sales were inching up, as was builder confidence, as measured by the National Association of Home Builders. Challenges persist in the housing market, said David Crowe, NAHB's chief economist, but he also predicts "modest, gradual" improvements heading into 2012. The mood was... more »