Latest Articles in Industry Watch

  • Today’s windows, doors and skylights bear little resemblance to those of yesteryear. Materials technology, designs, standards, testing protocols and installation requirements have continued to evolve, providing consumers with greater performance and aesthetic options at moreprice points. The old double-glazed window pane has moved well beyond a simple unit consisting of two lites of glass... more »
  • On average, 18 toddlers die annually by falling from windows, according to Safe Kids Worldwide. More than 98,000 children—an average of 14 per day—were treated in U.S. emergency rooms for windowfall-related injuries during the 1990-2008 time period, according to the most recent study on the subject. About 65 percent of those injuries involved children four years old and younger,... more »
  • An economic uptick might be on the horizon for the window and door industry, with many economists projecting positive growth for 2013 and beyond, as the 2012 election recedes into history. At least, as Kermit Baker, chief economist for the American Institute of Architects, says: “We can’t use the election excuse anymore for delaying decisions.” In general―barring the usual... more »
  • Anti-vinyl bias is again surfacing in the context of the ongoing evolution of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design green building rating system—expressed in draft versions of LEED 2012, now known as LEED v4, the successor to LEED 2009. The USGBC was slated to vote on LEED 2012 on June 1, 2012, but after 22,000 responses poured in during the... more »
  • When the economy is this precarious, every penny spent must be justified. Cost efficiency and a lean operating model becomes the Holy Grail for survival. The cost of joining and participating in a trade association must be weighed against other discretionary spending. But focusing on the cost is only half of the cost-benefit equation—never a good business practice. To fill in the rest of... more »
  • As in Samuel Beckett’s famous two-act play, “Waiting for Godot,” a lot of us must feel much like we’re waiting vainly for the arrival of some mysterious character to bring back happier days. True to the plot, while cruising through the statistics can dig up some positive areas to confirm a reasonable optimism, the overall economic picture remains largely inscrutable: Job... more »
  • Charles O. Everly—a friend to many in our industry and a prolific contributor to its advancement—passed April 8, 2012 at the age of 81 after a long illness. Charlie’s dedication to the codes and standards arena will not be forgotten, as he was instrumental in promoting industry positions and facilitating the understanding of complex code provisions and enforcement challenges.... more »
  • The American Architectural Manufacturers Association fully supports the Lead Exposure Reduction Amendments Act of 2012 (S2148), introduced in early March by Senator James Inhofe (R-Okla.). The bill seeks to restore the “opt-out” provision removed from the Environmental Protection Agency’s Lead Renovation, Repair and Painting rule in April 2010. In 2008, EPA finalized its RRP... more »
  • What do the Golden Gate Bridge, Spam, Elmer Fudd and the American Architectural Manufacturers Association have in common? All are celebrating 75th anniversaries this year. I’m not so sure about any special observances planned for Spam or Elmer Fudd, but I hear the Golden Gate’s milestone will feature a festival in late May. And, AAMA appropriately is celebrating its 75th Annual... more »
  • In last August's edition of this column, I noted that many potential homebuyers, leery about the economy and unable to sell their undervalued homes, are turning to remodeling and staying put. Statistics confirm that a growing number of Americans are spending more on home renovations, at the rate of an estimated $115.9 billion in the year ended June 2011, according to the Joint Center for Housing... more »