Latest Articles in TIP OF THE WEEK

  • Timing is an issue of critical importance in the sales process. A sales leader focuses on the right benefits and uses literature and samples very differently during various phases of the sales process. Early in the process, you should use literature and samples to highlight issues related to quality, design, and product selection. Later, you should select sales tools that educate the customer on... more »
  • Today, more than ever, your prospects are extremely busy and their time is at a premium. Recognize that an in-person sales call, e-mail, or phone call is an interruption of their daily schedule. Learn to communicate with them in the way they want to be communicated to and you’ll gain more permission to continue those relationships. This week’s tip comes from Rick Davis, president of... more »
  • The toughest phone call or e-mail is the first one. Stop procrastinating. There is only one way to begin a new relationship with a customer and that is by talking to them. Confucius said that a thousand-mile journey begins with a single step. Pick up the phone, type that e-mail and make contact! This week’s tip comes from Rick Davis, president of Building Leaders, Inc. and author of the... more »
  • Don’t assume your customers are all alike. You cannot truly help your customers until you understand their business models. Instead of selling the features and benefits of your product, ask questions and listen to discover ways your customer faces their competitive challenges. You will then distinguish yourself as a resource who can help them increase profits through better salesmanship.... more »
  • If you have taken time to prepare a presentation in chapters (like the sections of a well-organized book), your delivery will flow smoothly. You will no longer be thinking. You will deliver a heartfelt presentation at a level of unconscious competence. This week’s tip comes from Rick Davis, president of Building Leaders, Inc. and author of the book, Strategic Sales in the Building Industry... more »
  • Passive candidates are, by definition, people who are not currently looking for a job. Just because someone is a passive candidate doesn't mean the person is talented. Even if the person is talented, there are a host of factors that need to be addressed before the person is considered a viable prospect. These include things like: The job fit. It's important that the primary emphasis of the... more »
  • When is “customer service” more than just customer service? Every time. When your field service personnel are interacting with a client, customer, or frustrated homeowner, they are doing more than simply investigating and diagnosing what ails a particular window or door. In fact, they are the company’s eyes, ears, and mouthpiece. With that level of direct, personal interaction... more »
  • When a job opening is created, broaden your usual approach. In addition to seeking a full-time replacement, consider offering exciting employees, ex-employees and job applicants a nontraditional arrangement that meets immediate company and candidate needs. Here are a few ideas: Part-time hours (even one day a week) Job sharing On a per project basis Telecommuting from home with regular... more »
  • Newsletters (and e-newsletters) are an excellent way to stay in touch with your customers. They can help you promote ongoing service, lead to repeat business and are a great way to get referrals. But when developing content, ask yourself the question your customers ask: “What’s in it for me?” “WIIFM,” as it’s known in marketing circles, is crucial to the... more »
  • In difficult job markets there is more temptation than ever to bend the truth a little to get the job. This can leave the company with employees who can't do the job they were hired for. Identifying "red flags" will help you ensure that you can identify candidates with a depth of experience and expertise. Here are a few pointers: Before sorting through your pile of resumes, have a... more »