Latest Articles in COLUMN

  • "Rough opening” is a regular part of our terminology. Yet, the requirements and variations are not often fully understood. This lack of comprehensive knowledge can lead to both improperly installed windows and ordering errors. A good rough opening is the foundation of a proper installation, and in the case of replacement, the reference for ordering replacement products.  ... more »
  • Whirlpool Corp. took action and successfully made its case to U.S. Representatives Bob Latta (R-OH) and Peter Welch (D-VT) that a manufacturer of Energy Star products is entitled to protection from private claims or rights of action under state or federal law relating to liability arising out of the disqualification of a product from Energy Star. As a result, Latta-Welch introduced HR 4856, the... more »
  • This year’s ICC code development process focuses on two key areas: the revision of the 2012  International Green Construction Code and the pilot of the cdpACCESS program. In the June/July issue of Window & Door, I questioned the future viability of the IgCC. Despite rumors circulating within the ICC community at press time, however, there is no specific news to report. Yet, the... more »
  • As fenestration products have evolved to encompass greater numbers and combinations of operator types, materials and performance criteria, their governing standard has grown substantially. Consider this: In the 25 years since the advent of the first truly material-neutral, performance-oriented standard—AAMA 101-88—the scope has grown from 44 pages referencing 14 operator types and 45... more »
  • When the prominent members of the U.S. Colonies had concerns about the taxes being imposed upon them by Great Britain, they gathered together in person to discuss the issue. Although not all the delegates sent to Philadelphia from the various colonies were originally in favor of succession from Great Britain, by early July 1776, the Declaration of Independence was signed. It is somewhat... more »
  • AAMA, WDMA and the CSA recently released the user guide to AAMA/WDMA/CSA 101/I.S.2/A440 NAFS 2011. There, I just got through one of the longer acronym-laden titles ever known to the fenestration business. The NAFS 101 standards and guides represent the backbone of the window and door business in North America. The user guide must have taken a lot of effort to create, and you should become... more »
  • Given the enormous amount of U.S. energy consumption attributed to buildings, the 2013 State of the Union address announced a new goal of reducing energy losses in buildings by 50 percent over the next 20 years. The latest Department of Energy Research & Development report, “Windows and Building Envelope Research and Development Roadmap,” provides guidance to help make this happen... more »
  • This month, I’m revisiting an important subject: the future of the window replacement industry. My last column on the matter—in the October 2013 issue of Window & Door—addressed the increased difficulty and reduced replacement options we will face in the years ahead. Ironically, this will result from technological advances in new construction fenestration and wall interface... more »
  • Residential window and door products often operate in a world of hundredths: hundredths of an inch or hundredths of a degree. Products are certified, built and sold based on these measures and representations with respect to them. There might be risk when representations are made that fenestration products as installed provide unwavering compliance with all such finite measurements, and the legal... more »
  • Or, more specifically, if you publish a new model code, will people adopt and enforce it? With the advent of the International Codes in the late 1990s and early 2000s, the International Code Council was correct in its assumption that states and local jurisdictions would adopt the new codes. Although the 2000 International Building Code and 2000 International Residential Code were not widely... more »