Latest Articles in From the Field

  • The vertical separation between our living space and the elements is made up of three primary sectors: the common wall area, fenestration and the installation perimeter of the fenestration. All three share similar demands as part of the building envelope—to keep weather out and climate control in. Even though a window (or door) is an independent component in itself, it’s still a window, in a wall... more »
  • Humor yourself for a moment and read this out loud really fast: nail fin; flush fin; mounting flange; frontal flange; face flange; frontal fin; non-frontal flange; mounting fin; exterior flush fin; surface flange. So far, our industry has come up with these 10 terms (and a few others) to describe a grand total of two window frame appendages. I’m actually kind of amused by this and I’m... more »
  • I vividly remember a specific encounter years ago when I stepped into a fenestration dealer’s sales office to order some full-frame window units for a replacement job. The units were round-top mulled combinations, so they required more attention than normal for proper sizing. The salesperson and I were only acquaintances. However, I was purchasing from him because he had referred this... more »
  • "Rough opening” is a regular part of our terminology. Yet, the requirements and variations are not often fully understood. This lack of comprehensive knowledge can lead to both improperly installed windows and ordering errors. A good rough opening is the foundation of a proper installation, and in the case of replacement, the reference for ordering replacement products.  ... more »
  • This month, I’m revisiting an important subject: the future of the window replacement industry. My last column on the matter—in the October 2013 issue of Window & Door—addressed the increased difficulty and reduced replacement options we will face in the years ahead. Ironically, this will result from technological advances in new construction fenestration and wall interface... more »
  • For consumers, choosing a frame material is crucial to the window selection process. There are, after all, a lot of options available. It’s the job of the salesperson to find the best fit for the client and application.   Consumers typically choose a frame material based on the benefits it offers. But there is another factor to consider, and that is how the frame material can ease, or... more »
  • When I presented replacement challenges in the March/April issue, I focused mostly on full-frame replacement. Most agree this is by far the most difficult replacement scenario. Requirements for structural performance, and stopping air infiltration and water intrusion, depend on the installation, but are even more difficult to satisfy in this case. In many circumstances, however, full-frame... more »
  • When I presented replacement challenges in the March/April issue, I focused mostly on full-frame replacement. Most agree this is by far the most difficult replacement scenario. Requirements for structural performance, and stopping air infiltration and water intrusion, depend on the installation, but are even more difficult to satisfy in this case. In many circumstances, however, full-frame... more »
  • During a replacement installation, the installer is likely the only trade on the job, and he or she controls the quality of the finished project. But the existing condition of the structure, fenestration or components can limit installers’ ability to do their job properly if conditions won’t accommodate good installation practices. To make matters worse, industry instructions for many... more »
  • Fenestration performance complaints in new home construction can be frustrating, costly and time-consuming to fix. Should a performance issue arise with the installation, the installers are the ones called in to address the problem. A reliable installer will own up to the issue and resolve it. That being said, I need to pose this question: Is the fenestration installer solely responsible for the... more »