Latest Articles in From the Field

  • This month, I’m revisiting an important subject: the future of the window replacement industry. My last column on the matter—in the October 2013 issue of Window & Door—addressed the increased difficulty and reduced replacement options we will face in the years ahead. Ironically, this will result from technological advances in new construction fenestration and wall interface... more »
  • For consumers, choosing a frame material is crucial to the window selection process. There are, after all, a lot of options available. It’s the job of the salesperson to find the best fit for the client and application.   Consumers typically choose a frame material based on the benefits it offers. But there is another factor to consider, and that is how the frame material can ease, or... more »
  • When I presented replacement challenges in the March/April issue, I focused mostly on full-frame replacement. Most agree this is by far the most difficult replacement scenario. Requirements for structural performance, and stopping air infiltration and water intrusion, depend on the installation, but are even more difficult to satisfy in this case. In many circumstances, however, full-frame... more »
  • When I presented replacement challenges in the March/April issue, I focused mostly on full-frame replacement. Most agree this is by far the most difficult replacement scenario. Requirements for structural performance, and stopping air infiltration and water intrusion, depend on the installation, but are even more difficult to satisfy in this case. In many circumstances, however, full-frame... more »
  • During a replacement installation, the installer is likely the only trade on the job, and he or she controls the quality of the finished project. But the existing condition of the structure, fenestration or components can limit installers’ ability to do their job properly if conditions won’t accommodate good installation practices. To make matters worse, industry instructions for many... more »
  • Fenestration performance complaints in new home construction can be frustrating, costly and time-consuming to fix. Should a performance issue arise with the installation, the installers are the ones called in to address the problem. A reliable installer will own up to the issue and resolve it. That being said, I need to pose this question: Is the fenestration installer solely responsible for the... more »
  • In my last column I asked, “Will the replacement industry, as it is today, work for tomorrow?” I wasn’t referring to energy and performance standards; clearly, those will continue to advance. Instead, I was referring to the actual replacement process itself. Replacement, as we know it, consists of either installing a replacement product or exchanging a full frame. Both of these... more »
  • Fenestration technology has advanced dramatically in recent years―mostly to the consumer’s benefit―in the form of thermal, structural and sound-deadening performance, and aesthetic improvements. Revised new construction installation practices have been developed and adopted as well. All of these are welcome advances, but this fenestration evolution also presents challenges to the... more »
  • Here are a few of my personal gems: Ordering a 24-inch width when I meant to order a 2/4 width Ordering a one-over-one double-hung when I should have ordered a full view picture window Ordering equal sash when I should have ordered cottage sash Ordering the default hardware color when it should have been a color option. How can mistakes like these occur when I aim to be meticulous with the... more »
  • Job site efficiency results in faster, higher quality―and ultimately more profitable―installations. However, achieving high levels of efficiency is by no means automatic. It takes a dedicated effort to assess and develop productive work habits. Perfect efficiency is unattainable, but continuous improvement offers great returns. Workflow is a key component to job site efficiency. Specifically,... more »