Latest Articles in Energy Efficiency

  • This week, WDMA expressed its opinion on behalf of the window and door industry that tax credits for energy efficient products should be reinstated. In a letter to House officials, WDMA argued that the tax credits worked to spur purchases of energy efficient fenestration products, particularly among middle-class homeowners. Here in the industry, many of us believe that tax incentives created... more »
  • Demonstrations of some of the new equipment and products featured in Atlanta
    For a comprehensive look at window and door product offerings on display in the aisles of the Georgia World Congress Center, also see Snapshots from GlassBuild 2011.   Insulating Glass Production Equipment   Automated Tri-Lite Assembly System from GED Integrated Solutions www.gedusa.com   Flexible Spacer Assembly Line featuring a new automated gas-filling unit from Erdman... more »
  • Walking the aisle of GlassBuild last year, one of the most common terms I heard and saw was "R-5." It hasn't disappeared completely at this year's show, but I am definitely hearing it much less. It's also not as evident in the displays of suppliers. Companies are still talking about energy performance, certainly. Gas-filling, triples, triple silver coatings. They're all... more »
  • Potential opportunity, but the industry and individual companies need to be aware of movement
    Should window dealers become home performance companies? While the home performance industry is still in its infancy, indications in the marketplace and in regulatory arena point to sharp growth in this field in the near future, according to many window and door industry professionals. “The green movement is the next frontier. If you’re not a business owner willing to change, you... more »
  • There is an adage that goes something like this: What you don't know won't hurt you. Well, I'm not sure how true that is. It leaves an awful lot to chance. And as businessmen and women, we independent window and door dealers can't afford to leave too much to chance— especially in this economy. One perfect example of the dangers of leaving something to chance is the Department of Energy... more »
  • Commercial products are being added
    The U.S. Department of Energy High Performance Windows Volume Purchase Program begins Phase II in May. After a year’s experience, the program is being expanded to include commercial windows. Also noteworthy will be changes to the program Web site to provide more pricing information to potential buyers. The purpose of the program, initially known as the R-5 Window Program, has been to bring... more »
  • Tax credits for energy effircient home improvements are scheduled to expire at the end of year. Now, new draft legislation has emerged in the Senate that would extend and even expand those credits.  Yes, I'm sympathetic to the view of many that government should stay out of our business, but I think that's good news.  The bad news is that, as written, the initial bill provides... more »
  • In May, the Department of Energy launched the R-5 Window Volume Purchase Program with great fanfare. Under this program, homeowners and property owners would learn the value of R-5 energy efficiency and get the benefit of fixed and clear pricing on R-5 qualified windows. With some trepidation, we at Haddon Windows & Doors entered the program to be one of the inaugural certified vendors.... more »
  • Manufacturers need to examine numerous production and market considerations for both approaches
    It is certainly evident that the North American window industry is on a charted path toward improved energy efficiency. In fact, it appears to be moving toward common standards for both new construction and remodel and replacement markets. These markets are converging near a future recommended R-5 rating–or U-values of 0.22 for operable windows and 0.20 for non-operable windows. This... more »
  • I bought a car last spring that was rated 29 mpg highway. Now conventional wisdom is a new car will never actually achieve the performance rating given. Those numbers are for comparison only and “actual mileage may vary.” So imagine my surprise when, after returning from a road trip this summer over which my average speed exceeded 50 mph, I learned that my gas mileage for that trip... more »