Latest Articles in Strategies & Practices

  • Started as an innovator, Thermal Industries' looks to stay ahead of the market
    Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, Thermal Industries owes its success to "embracing new ideas, even if sometimes considered counter-culture," says David Rascoe, president.  The Pittsburgh-based manufacturer, he states, has consistently launched products before the market even realized there was a need for them and, through its own intuition, became “green before... more »
  • When I saw this week's news from UL that it's now working on its sustainability standards for windows and doors what struck me most is the fact that we've had so few "green" headlines of late. With tax credits, Home Star and R-5, energy efficiency shows no signs of going away, but I started wondering if concerns about recycled content or certified forests were on the wane? I thought I'd... more »
  • We see some interesting news this week in the window and door industry that focuses on branding. First, we see the resurgence of the Stanley brand in the door arena. That should be a name brand many homeowners remember from years ago. But what really got my attention was the Kathy Ireland backing of Window World products. Who would have thought? I guess it shouldn't be surprising... more »
  • Colorado company developing windows that heat and insulate, providing new opportunity for increased energy savings
    With increased interest in energy efficient windows, Radiant Glass Industries is throwing its hat in the ring with Power*e glass, a radiant-heat window technology that heats and insulates home interiors. The Denver-based company has installed the glass in about a dozen projects. Offering the appearance of a standard double-pane IG unit, the Radiant glass produces heat, while reducing energy... more »
  • Despite unified industry pleas to delay implementation based on training bottlenecks and the poor timing of adding yet another speed bump to an ailing industry’s road to recovery, the Environmental Protection Agency decided to go live with its new Lead: Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule on April 22, 2010. The new measure (40 CFR § 745.85) requires renovation work that disturbs more... more »
  • Selling windows and doors in today’s economy is hard. The replacement window business has remained comparatively strong, but selling directly to consumers is stil a challenge. Not only is it difficult to sell products in an economy where housing prices have plummeted and homeowners are spending more conservatively, but consumers are more skeptical and always looking for a “deal.... more »
  • When PGT Industries went public in 2006, window and door sales were already starting to decline, but no one was predicting a freefall. The overall market, including PGT's opportunities to expand both its impact product sales and regionally, provided reasonable growth prospects for potential investors. Now four years and one economic meltdown later, Ply Gem is testing the waters with investors.... more »
  • Automation adds "coolness factor" to sliding doors
    Windows and doors certainly serve a functional role in a home, offering comfort and protection. They also add an element of style to many homes, as colors and finish options have exploded in recent years to keep up with homeowners’ varied tastes. But in an era of flat-screen TVs, granite countertops and stainless steel appliances, it’s a bit of a stretch to think of windows and doors... more »
  • The first several months of 2010 represented somewhat of an industry first. As the Environmental Protection Agency’s new lead renovation, repair and painting rule was set to go in effect, window and door manufacturers and dealers—along with others from the building products and construction industry—went to Washington, D.C., en masse to make their case. Instead of its typical... more »
  • Costs are miniscule compared to potential litigation and damage to reputation
    In general, a product manufacturer or importer has the duty to design and manufacture or represent a product that is reasonably safe and effective for its intended purposes. The company can be held liable for damages to persons or property incurred when the product is used according to the expectations of a typical consumer. This is the basis for the principle of “implied warranty”... more »