After 50 Years, Andersen Retires Narroline Double Hung

February 4, 2013
Noteworthy

Employees and retirees gathered at Andersen Corp.'s Bayport, Minn., manufacturing plant, January 31, to see the last Andersen Narroline double-hung window roll off the production line, marking an end to 50 years of history.  More than 50 million of the window units have been installed in homes across the United States and abroad, the manufacturer reports.

 
 One of the last Narroline double hungs to come off the production line.

The Narroline window, which rolled out in February 1962, was completely factory assembled, packed two to a carton, and featured primed exterior frame parts. Its relatively humble beginnings started when Vern Frederickson, then chief engineer and head of research and development at Andersen, announced to his small staff of four that he was designing a new window. Two days later, he handed the sketches over to the product designers to work out the details, according to the company.

Four years, later, when Andersen introduced exterior cladding to the industry with its Perma-Shield cladding system, the Andersen Narroline window became the first clad wood window product ever produced by any manufacturer.

“We’ve made product enhancements to the Narroline window since ’66, but it’s pretty much the same window to this day. A workhorse—simple design, easy to install and reliable performance” says Pat Vogler, vice president of operations at Andersen.

The Narroline double-hung window’s popularity waned as Andersen launched other double-hung products beginning in 1993. Succeeding the Narroline window are the 400 Series tilt-wash double-hung, 200 Series tilt-wash double-hung, Woodwright double-hung, A-Series double-hung and 100 Series single-hung window products.

Andersen continues manufacturing Narroline window conversion kits, which feature Andersen 400 Series tilt-wash sash. With millions of units sold, these kits enable homeowners to upgrade their existing Andersen Narroline windows to new technology without disturbing the frame or interior and exterior trim, officials note.