Latest Articles in Codes & Standards

  • WDMA conference brings trade policy to light
    Last week, the Window & Door Manufacturers Association brought together industry stakeholders and members of Congress, agency leaders and political strategists for its signature policymaking event. The lineup of speakers included representatives from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Politico, the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Manufacturers, and a Republican... more »
  • Manufacturers can now seek unlimited extensions
    Managing Liability  With the ability to receive more extensions also comes heightened concern regarding a manufacturer’s potential liability. Below are a few examples of ways to manage potential liability. Record Retention  A manufacturer should maintain documentation from the original certification up through the current extension. Keep all test reports, drawings, bills of... more »
  • Major requirements were set forth in the published 2018 I-codes for windows, doors, skylights and other fenestration products in single family homes, duplexes and townhouses that are three stories or less in height. These types of buildings are referred to as “low rise residential construction” within the family of International Codes, and requirements for them are established in the... more »
  • To keep up with evolving technology and industry concerns, new editions of the 15 different I-codes covered by the International Code Council are published every three years. The 2018 versions, which took effect Jan. 1, are the latest. Of these, the codes of greatest typical interest to fenestration manufacturers are the 2018 International Building Code, International Residential Code and... more »
  • A road map of the code development process
    What’s in the Code Groups? The I-codes, published every three years, are divided into groups A and B, which staggers the development process to minimize bottlenecks and facilitate participation. Group A (2018) codes typically of interest to the fenestration industry include: International Building Code (egress, fire safety and general provisions) International Fire Code International... more »
  • The evolving risks of claims in green building
    Green building and energy performance are ever-developing areas within the construction industry. So too are the associated risks for industry stakeholders. So far, claims relating to green building construction have been—and will likely continue to be—asserted based on theories that resemble traditional construction defect claims. This can include claims related to breach of... more »
  • Hurricane Florence has dominated headlines this week and last, as the powerful storm brought a major surge and heavy rains to the Carolinas and beyond. With significant flooding affecting the areas, recovery crews have their work cut out for them. While the weather activity along the coast is serious, it still doesn’t compare to the Atlantic hurricane season of 2017. Remember last year?... more »
  • With an emphasis on net zero, where does fenestration go from here?
    About 50 years ago, there were essentially only two window framing materials to choose from for residential buildings: wood and mill-finish aluminum, typically with single-pane glass. My childhood home near Milwaukee was like a lot of other homes that were built following World War II. Despite my father’s best attempts to add “storm windows” (read: putty glazed, ¼-inch... more »
  • Setting standards for innovations to come
    It appears that the future of windows and doors will involve the confluence of technologies that previously have had little to do with fenestration products. Some examples of improved fenestration functionality being conceptually introduced around the industry involve automatic operation of fenestration products, as well as integrated security, locking and alarm systems. There are also plans for... more »
  • Written limited warranties and energy performance
    Written limited warranties are exceptionally good tools for defining the expectations of buyers and sellers regarding a product up-front. However, manufacturers and sellers should be aware that, despite the express terms and limitations of the written warranty, in other words, representations or statements concerning a product which are made outside the confines of the warranty (e.g. product... more »