Latest Articles in COLUMN

  • MI Windows achieves OSHA Voluntary Protection Programs star for safety
     Editor’s Note: This article is based on the safety roundtable held at the American Architectural Manufacturers Association 2018 Fall Conference. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration is often considered to be the police of workplace safety. OSHA sets rules and regulations, performs audits, issues fines and more, all in an effort to create safer workplaces. However, two... more »
  • To keep up with evolving technology and industry concerns, new editions of the 15 different I-codes covered by the International Code Council are published every three years. The 2018 versions, which took effect Jan. 1, are the latest. Of these, the codes of greatest typical interest to fenestration manufacturers are the 2018 International Building Code, International Residential Code and... more »
  • Latest market study highlights bright outlook
     The American Architectural Manufacturers Association’s annual fenestration market study has been a fixture of its service to the industry over many years, but its scope and rigor have increased over time. Manufacturers and suppliers are interviewed with a participation rate in excess of 50 percent and data from multiple secondary sources is triangulated to support the overall analysis... more »
  • Former Dealers of the Year share insights
     On September 13, the Window and Door Dealers Alliance, along with Window & Door magazine, honored its 2018 Dealer of the Year recipients at a ceremony at Window & Door Dealer Day in Las Vegas. This prestigious program honors excellence in the window and door industry, and this year’s honorees represent new and innovative programs and processes.  While these stories... more »
  • Would you want to work for you?
    If you had the opportunity to work for yourself, would you? This question has been popping up in conversations with several clients lately. It’s come up during a board strategy session. It’s been discussed during coaching calls. And, it’s come up while discussing the challenges of working in a multi-generational workplace.  It’s so easy to point out the mistakes of... more »
  • A road map of the code development process
    What’s in the Code Groups? The I-codes, published every three years, are divided into groups A and B, which staggers the development process to minimize bottlenecks and facilitate participation. Group A (2018) codes typically of interest to the fenestration industry include: International Building Code (egress, fire safety and general provisions) International Fire Code International... more »
  • The evolving risks of claims in green building
    Green building and energy performance are ever-developing areas within the construction industry. So too are the associated risks for industry stakeholders. So far, claims relating to green building construction have been—and will likely continue to be—asserted based on theories that resemble traditional construction defect claims. This can include claims related to breach of... more »
  • New installation practice organizes complicated options for brick veneer walls
    Install Basics As is known throughout the fenestration community, improper window installation can contribute to excessive air infiltration, water penetration, sound intrusion and condensation as well as insufficient structural integrity. And, also well-known, water penetration can commonly lead to a variety of familiar problems. But there are best practices that can help avoid these issues.... more »
  • A look inside Ply Gem Canada’s manufacturing process
    Right: “To optimize space, we combined two stations into one, with rotating and squaring functionality in the same rack,” Dave Bamford, production supervisor, explains. “[This enables] the operator to install panels on both sides without moving from his present position.” (All images courtesy of Ply Gem.) The story rings true for most all fenestration manufacturers: the... more »
  • With an emphasis on net zero, where does fenestration go from here?
    About 50 years ago, there were essentially only two window framing materials to choose from for residential buildings: wood and mill-finish aluminum, typically with single-pane glass. My childhood home near Milwaukee was like a lot of other homes that were built following World War II. Despite my father’s best attempts to add “storm windows” (read: putty glazed, ¼-inch... more »