Latest Articles in Design & Performance

  • A road map of the code development process
    What’s in the Code Groups? The I-codes, published every three years, are divided into groups A and B, which staggers the development process to minimize bottlenecks and facilitate participation. Group A (2018) codes typically of interest to the fenestration industry include: International Building Code (egress, fire safety and general provisions) International Fire Code International... more »
  • The evolving risks of claims in green building
    Green building and energy performance are ever-developing areas within the construction industry. So too are the associated risks for industry stakeholders. So far, claims relating to green building construction have been—and will likely continue to be—asserted based on theories that resemble traditional construction defect claims. This can include claims related to breach of... more »
  • New installation practice organizes complicated options for brick veneer walls
    Install Basics As is known throughout the fenestration community, improper window installation can contribute to excessive air infiltration, water penetration, sound intrusion and condensation as well as insufficient structural integrity. And, also well-known, water penetration can commonly lead to a variety of familiar problems. But there are best practices that can help avoid these issues.... more »
  • Hurricane Florence has dominated headlines this week and last, as the powerful storm brought a major surge and heavy rains to the Carolinas and beyond. With significant flooding affecting the areas, recovery crews have their work cut out for them. While the weather activity along the coast is serious, it still doesn’t compare to the Atlantic hurricane season of 2017. Remember last year?... more »
  • With an emphasis on net zero, where does fenestration go from here?
    About 50 years ago, there were essentially only two window framing materials to choose from for residential buildings: wood and mill-finish aluminum, typically with single-pane glass. My childhood home near Milwaukee was like a lot of other homes that were built following World War II. Despite my father’s best attempts to add “storm windows” (read: putty glazed, ¼-inch... more »
  • Setting standards for innovations to come
    It appears that the future of windows and doors will involve the confluence of technologies that previously have had little to do with fenestration products. Some examples of improved fenestration functionality being conceptually introduced around the industry involve automatic operation of fenestration products, as well as integrated security, locking and alarm systems. There are also plans for... more »
  • Written limited warranties and energy performance
    Written limited warranties are exceptionally good tools for defining the expectations of buyers and sellers regarding a product up-front. However, manufacturers and sellers should be aware that, despite the express terms and limitations of the written warranty, in other words, representations or statements concerning a product which are made outside the confines of the warranty (e.g. product... more »
  • Top window installation mistakes
    Example of an installation mistake in a building under construction in which flashing is only at the head and jambs. (Image by Kaitlyn Rinka.) Installation is the determining factor of whether the performance designed into a window is realized in actual service. Even the best-designed and thoroughly tested product can fail if improperly installed.  Experience shows that there are avoidable... more »
  • I had the opportunity to attend the American Institute of Architects annual conference in New York City this summer. From my perspective, it was a great, busy show, with big names from around the industry, international attendees and a good energy overall. At the event, I noticed that talk about energy efficiency is more dominant than ever, with architects searching for methods and materials to... more »
  • How the Lead: Renovation, Repair and Painting Rule stands to continue to raise the cost of window replacement
    THE COST OF COMPLIANCE:  The length of the required contractor training course:8 HOURS Cost of the class per worker:~$562 EPA registration fee:~$300 Failure to meet requirements of the update:~$37,500per violation, per day Estimated additional cost per Window: ~$120-$200 After completing a federally mandated regulatory impact review under Section 610 of the Regulatory Flexibility... more »