Latest Articles in Strategies & Practices

  • The way homeowners buy has dramatically changed over the past few years. Take a recent Forbes Insights survey, for example, which cited that customers prefer to leverage online technology and in-store visits for major purchases.  Before they even pick up the phone, homeowners are searching websites, reading reviews on Houzz and Yelp, checking Facebook pages, and researching all the brand... more »
  • I have already learned a great deal in my time with Window & Door magazine; along with the technical details of the fenestration business, I am getting to know the men and women who make up this industry. Make no mistake, while the stock in trade is entry and interior doors, windows, components and supplies, the heart of this business is the people. I have encountered a variety of companies... more »
  • Does it Still Matter?
    There’s been a lot of talk in the online marketing community about whether keyword rankings are as important as they used to be. Specifically, the question is whether we should bother with tracking and reporting these rankings. The argument against doing so is that there are now many variables that keep us from determining “one true ranking.” A keyword’s rank could vary... more »
  • Demystifying the budget conversation
    Why is it that, when you mention the word budget, homeowners freeze? An otherwise pleasant conversation suddenly comes to a screeching halt as soon as you dare to say “let’s talk about your budget.” The response, more often than not, is crickets. Truth is: homeowners are afraid of being wrong, of overspending or being duped. Not to mention, most are unfamiliar with the products... more »
  • Prop 65 gives food for thought
    California’s Proposition 65 is hardly new and it is relatively well-known that it requires manufacturers to establish potential warning label requirements for, among other things, all goods sold for consumer use in California. But Prop 65 is also recognized as a ready source of liability in the event of a compliance failure. These claims are pursued by the seemingly endless number of... more »
  • An objection is a buying signal. It’s an indication that the client is interested in purchasing something—and likely from you—as soon as the discrepancy between your offer and their purchasing conditions is rectified. An objection is an opening for further discovery, further information and a more refined solution. Though, this interpretation is polar opposite of how most... more »
  • Capture business wealth and pass the baton to the next generation
    Editor's Note: This is the first in a series of articles on exit planning and succession that will run in the remainder of our 2017 issues. If you have an exit/succession story to share, please email Emily Thompson, editor in chief, at ethompson@glass.org. (This series originally ran in Glass Magazine, Window & Door's sister publication.) In running your window and door business there is only... more »
  • Salesperson “A” has many opportunities, and he seems to be able to move through the sales process effortlessly and simultaneously. On paper he doesn’t appear to be any more talented or intelligent than any of his peers, but he closes more deals than his peers. Salesperson “B” is full of confidence and charisma and people naturally like him. He knows and understands... more »
  • The Online Governmental Consensus Vote could change how codes are developed
    The Final Action for the International Code Council Group B Code cycle has finally been determined. It took longer than usual for the 2016 ICC Group B Code cycle because of the addition of the Online Governmental Consensus Vote after the conclusion of the Public Comment Hearings, but it did not take as long as it did for the 2015 ICC Group A Code cycle. The OGCV after the 2015 ICC Group A Public... more »
  • In the last installment of Industry Watch, we looked at the Department of Labor’s move to redefine overtime pay. As readers may recall, the new edict proposed last summer set out to essentially double the salary threshold under which employees would have to be paid overtime for hours worked beyond 40 per week from the current annual level of $23,660 to $47,476. If it became effective... more »